“Limited Liability”

The experienced or well-informed investor recognizes that there is an element of risk in every business venture. They understand that the cash or other property they have contributed to the venture may be lost for any number of reasons – an economic downturn, a very competitive industry, the incompetence of officers, an adverse

“Tax free” – two words that often bring great delight when they are spoken by a tax adviser to the owner of a business, whether he is considering the disposition of a single asset, or of substantially all of the assets, of his business. (It’s the feeling I have when the local McDonald’s offers two-for-one

Picking up on yesterday’s discussion, how can a PEF reconcile its preference to acquire a depreciable or amortizable basis for its target’s assets while, at the same time, affording the target’s owners the opportunity to roll-over a portion of their equity in the target into the PEF HC on a tax-favored basis? The answer is hardly simple, and it will depend upon a number factors.
Continue Reading Rolling Over Target Equity Into A PE Fund: Part II

For many business owners, the final step of a successful career may be the sale of their business. At that point, the investment into which the owners have dedicated so much time, effort and money is liquidated, leaving them with what is hopefully a significant pool of funds with which to enjoy their retirement, diversify

During the course of the year, we encounter a number of shareholder disputes. Sometimes we represent a minority shareholder; sometimes we represent the corporation or the majority shareholders. shareholderlit-300x263

Regardless of who the players are, the resolution of the dispute will involve some economic deal. The economic deal, in turn, will depend in no small part

Last week’s posts described a situation in which the IRS was able to collect a deficiency in corporate income tax from a minority shareholder of the taxpayer-corporation on the basis of transferee liability under state law. Recently, another decision addressed the question of transferee liability, this time in the instance of a dissolved corporation’s unpaid

Installment Reporting: Sale of Corporate Stock v. Sale of Partnership Interest

Most advisers understand that if a taxpayer sells his or her shares of stock in a corporation in exchange for a promissory note, the taxpayer generally can defer recognition of the gain realized on the sale until principal payments are received on the note