I am excited to announce that my June 18, 2018 blog post “S Corps, CFCs & The Tax Cuts & Jobs Act” has been published as Chapter 6 in The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act: A Guide for Practitioners e-book. The chapter discusses the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act’s changes to the taxation of business income arising from the foreign activities of U.S. persons – and what that means for the increasing number of closely-held U.S. businesses who have established operations overseas.

The e-book was produced by the National Association of Enrolled Agents (NAEA). If you are interested in purchasing a copy, please click here.

Pro “C” Corporation Bias?

Although closely-held businesses have generally welcomed the TCJA’s[i] amendments to the Code relating to the taxation of business income, many are also frustrated by the complexity of some of these changes. Among the provisions that have drawn the most criticism on this count are the changes to the taxation of business income arising from the foreign (“outbound”) activities of U.S. persons.

Because more and more closely-held U.S. businesses, including many S corporations, have been establishing operations overseas – whether through branches or corporate subsidiaries[ii] – the impact of these changes cannot be underestimated.

Moreover, their effect may be more keenly felt by closely-held U.S. businesses that are treated as pass-through entities[iii]; in other words, there appears to be a bias in the TCJA in favor of C corporations.

Overview: Deferred Recognition of Foreign Income – Pre-TCJA

In general, the U.S. has taxed U.S. persons on their worldwide income, although there has been some deferral of the taxation of the foreign-sourced income[iv] earned by the foreign corporate (“FC”) subsidiaries of U.S. businesses.[v]

The Code defines a “U.S. person” to include U.S. citizens and residents.[vi] A corporation or partnership is treated as a U.S. person if it is organized or created under the laws of the U.S. or of any State.[vii]

In general, income earned directly by a U.S. person from the conduct of a foreign business – for example, through the operation of a branch in a foreign jurisdiction – is taxed on a current basis.[viii]

Historically, however, active foreign business income earned indirectly by a U.S. person, through a FC subsidiary, generally has not been subject to U.S. tax until the income is distributed as a dividend to the U.S. person – unless an anti-deferral rule applies.

The CFC Regime

The main U.S. anti-tax-deferral regime, which addresses the taxation of income earned by controlled foreign corporations (“CFC”), may cause some U.S. persons who own shares of stock of a CFC to be taxed currently on certain categories of income earned by the CFC, regardless of whether the income has been distributed to them as a dividend.[ix]

CFC

A CFC is defined as any FC if U.S. persons own (directly, indirectly, or constructively[x]) more than 50-percent of the corporation’s stock (measured by vote or value), taking into account only those U.S. persons who own at least 10-percent of the FC’s stock (measured by vote or value; each a “United States shareholder” or “USS”).[xi]

Subpart F Income

Under the CFC rules, the U.S. generally taxes the USS of a CFC on their pro rata shares of the CFC’s “subpart F income,” without regard to whether the income is distributed to the shareholders. In effect, the U.S. treats the USS of a CFC as having received a current distribution of the CFC’s subpart F income.

In the case of most USS, subpart F income generally includes “foreign base company income,” which consists of “foreign personal holding company income” (such as dividends, interest, rents, and royalties), and certain categories of income from business operations that involve transactions with “related persons,” including “foreign base company sales income” and “foreign base company services income.”[xii]

One exception to the definition of subpart F income permits continued U.S.-tax-deferral for income received by a CFC in certain transactions with a related corporation organized and operating in the same foreign country in which the CFC is organized (the “same country exception”). Another exception is available for any item of income received by a CFC if the taxpayer establishes that the income was subject to an effective foreign income tax rate greater than 90-percent of the maximum U.S. corporate income tax rate (the “high-tax exception”).[xiii]

Actual Distributions

A USS may exclude from its income actual distributions of earnings and profits (“E&P”) from the CFC that were previously included in the USS’s income under the CFC regime.[xiv] Ordering rules provide that distributions from a CFC are treated as coming first out of E&P of the CFC that were previously taxed under the CFC regime, then out of other E&P.[xv]

Foreign Tax Credit

Subject to certain limitations, U.S. persons are allowed to claim a credit for foreign income taxes they pay. A foreign tax credit (“FTC”) generally is available to offset, in whole or in part, the U.S. income tax owed on foreign-source income included in the U.S. person’s income; this includes foreign taxes paid by an S corporation on any of its foreign income that flows through to its shareholders.

A domestic corporation is allowed a “deemed-paid” credit for foreign income taxes paid by the CFC that the domestic corporation is deemed to have paid when the related income is included in the domestic corporation’s income under the anti-deferral rules.[xvi]

Unfortunately for S corporations, they are treated as partnerships – not corporations – for purposes of the FTC and the CFC rules; thus, they cannot pass-through any such deemed-paid credit to their shareholders.

However, any tax that is withheld by the CFC with respect to a dividend distributed to an S corporation will flow through to the S corporation’s individual shareholders.

TCJA Changes

The TCJA made some significant changes to the taxation of USS that own stock in CFCs.

Transition Rule: Mandatory Inclusion

In order to provide a clean slate for the application of these new rules, the TCJA provides a special transition rule that requires all USS of a “specified foreign corporation” (“SFC”) to include in income their pro rata shares of the SFC’s “accumulated post-1986 deferred foreign income” (“post-1986-DFI”) that was not previously taxed to them.[xvii] A SFC means (1) a CFC or (2) any FC in which a domestic corporation is a USS.[xviii]

The mechanism for the mandatory inclusion of these pre-effective-date foreign earnings is the CFC regime. The TCJA provides that the subpart F income of a SFC is increased for the last taxable year of the SFC that begins before January 1, 2018.

This transition rule applies to all USS of a SFC, including individuals.

Consistent with the general operation of the CFC regime, each USS of a SFC must include in income its pro rata share of the SFC’s subpart F income attributable to the corporation’s post-1986-DFI.

Reduced Tax Rate

Fortunately, the TCJA allows a portion of that pro rata share of deferred foreign income to be deducted. The amount deductible varies, depending upon whether the deferred foreign income is held by the SFC in the form of liquid or illiquid assets. To the extent the income is not so deductible – i.e., is included in the income of the USS – the USS may claim a portion of the foreign tax credit attributable thereto.

The total deduction from the amount included under the transition rule is the amount necessary to result in a 15.5-percent tax rate on post-1986-DFI held by the SFC in the form of cash or cash equivalents,[xix] and an 8-percent tax rate on all other earnings.

The calculation of the deduction is based on the highest rate of tax applicable to domestic corporations in the taxable year of inclusion, even if the USS is an individual.

However, an individual USS – including the shareholder of an S corporation – will be taxed on the amount included in their income at the higher federal tax rate applicable to individuals.[xx]

That being said, an individual USS, including one who is a shareholder of an S corporation, generally may elect application of the corporate tax rates for the year of inclusion.[xxi]

Deferred Payment of Tax

A USS may elect to pay the net tax liability resulting from the mandatory inclusion of post-1986-DFI in eight unequal installments.[xxii] The timely payment of an installment does not incur interest.[xxiii]

The provision also includes an acceleration rule. If (1) there is a failure to pay timely any required installment, (2) there is a liquidation or sale of substantially all of the USS’s assets, (3) the USS ceases business, or (4) another similar circumstance arises, the unpaid portion of all remaining installments will become due immediately.

Special Deferral for S corporation Shareholders

A special rule permits deferral of the above transitional tax liability for shareholders of a USS that is an S corporation.

The S corporation is required to report on its income tax return the amount includible in gross income by reason of this provision, as well as the amount of deduction that would be allowable, and to provide a copy of such information to its shareholders.

Any shareholder of the S corporation may elect to defer their portion of the tax liability until the shareholder’s taxable year in which a “triggering event” occurs.[xxiv]

Three types of events may trigger an end to deferral of this tax liability. The first is a change in the status of the corporation as an S corporation. The second category includes liquidation, sale of substantially all corporate assets, termination of the company or end of business, or similar event, including reorganization in bankruptcy. The third type of triggering event is a transfer of shares of stock in the S corporation by the electing taxpayer, whether by sale, death or otherwise, unless the transferee of the stock agrees to be liable for tax liability in the same manner as the transferor.[xxv]

If a shareholder of an S corporation has elected deferral under this special rule, and a triggering event occurs, then the S corporation and the electing shareholder will be jointly and severally liable for any tax liability (and related interest or penalties).[xxvi]

After a triggering event occurs, an electing shareholder may elect to pay the tax liability in eight installments, subject to rules similar to those generally applicable absent deferral. Whether a shareholder may elect to pay in installments depends upon the type of event that triggered the end of deferral. If the triggering event is a liquidation, sale of substantially all corporate assets, termination of the company or end of business, or similar event, the installment payment election is not available. Instead, the entire tax liability is due upon notice and demand.[xxvii]

The New CFC Regime

With the mandatory “repatriation” of the post-1986-DFI of SFC, the TCJA implemented a new “participation exemption” regime for the taxation of USS of “specified 10-percent-owned FCs,”[xxviii] effective for taxable years of FCs beginning after December 31, 2017.

Dividends Received Deduction

Specifically, it allows an exemption for certain foreign income by means of a 100-percent deduction for the foreign-source portion of dividends[xxix] received from a specified-10%-owned FC by a domestic corporation that is a USS of such FC.[xxx]

The term “dividends received” is intended to be interpreted broadly; for example, if a domestic corporation indirectly owns stock of a FC through a partnership, and the domestic corporation would qualify for the DRD with respect to dividends from the FC if the domestic corporation owned such stock directly, the domestic corporation would be allowed a DRD with respect to its distributive share of the partnership’s dividend from the FC.[xxxi]

This DRD is available only to regular domestic C corporations that are USS, including those that own stock of a FC through a partnership; it is not available to C corporations that own less than 10% of the FC. The DRD is available only for the foreign-source portion of dividends received by a qualifying domestic corporation from a speficied-10-percent-owned FC.

No foreign tax credit or deduction is allowed to a USS for any foreign taxes paid or accrued by the FC (including withholding taxes) with respect to any portion of a dividend distribution that qualifies for the DRD.[xxxii]

Significantly, the DRD is not available to individuals; nor is it available to S corporations or their shareholders. Considering that an S corporation is not entitled to the deemed-paid credit for foreign income taxes paid by its foreign subsidiary, the income of the foreign subsidiary may be taxed twice: once by the foreign country and, when distributed, by the U.S.[xxxiii]

Holding Period

A domestic corporation is not permitted a DRD in respect of any dividend on any share of stock of a specified-10-percent-owned FC unless it satisfies a minimum holding period.

Specifically, the FC’s stock must have been held by the domestic corporation for at least 365 days during the 731-day period beginning on the date that is 365 days before the date on which the share becomes ex-dividend with respect to the dividend. For this purpose, the holding period requirement is treated as met only if the specified-10-percent-owned FC qualifies as such at all times during the period, and the taxpayer is a USS with respect to such FC at all times during the period.

GILTI

Having captured and taxed the post-1986-DFI of SFC (through 2017), and having introduced the DRD, the TCJA also introduced a new class of income – “global intangible low-taxed income” (“GILTI”) – that must be included in income by a USS of a CFC, and which further erodes a taxpayer’s ability to defer the U.S. taxation of foreign income.

Amount Included

This provision requires the current inclusion[xxxiv] in income by a USS of (i) their share of all of a CFC’s non-subpart F income (other than income that is effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business and income that is excluded from foreign base company income by reason of the high-tax exception),[xxxv] (ii) less an amount equal to the USS’s share of 10-percent of the adjusted basis of the CFC’s tangible property used in its trade or business and of a type with respect to which a depreciation deduction is generally allowable (the difference being GILTI).[xxxvi]

In the case of a CFC engaged in a service business or other business with few fixed assets, the GILTI inclusion rule may result in the U.S taxation of the CFC’s non-subpart F business income without the benefit of any deferral.

This income inclusion rule applies to both individual and corporate USS.

In the case of an individual, the maximum federal tax rate on GILTI is 37-percent.[xxxvii] This is the rate that will apply, for example, to a U.S. citizen who directly owns at least 10-percent of the stock of a CFC, or to one who indirectly owns such CFC stock through an S corporation.

C Corporations

More forgiving rules apply in the case of a USS that is a C corporation. For taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017, and before January 1, 2026, a regular domestic C corporation is generally allowed a deduction of an amount equal to 50-percent of its GILTI; thus, the federal corporate tax rate for GILTI is actually 10.5% (the 21% flat rate multiplied by 50%).[xxxviii]

In addition, for any amount of GILTI included in the gross income of a domestic C corporation, the corporation is allowed a deemed-paid credit equal to 80-percent of the foreign taxes paid or accrued by the CFC with respect to such GILTI.

Based on the interaction of the 50-percent deduction and the 80-percent foreign tax credit, the U.S. tax rate on GILTI that is included in the income of a regular C corporation will be zero where the foreign tax rate on such income is 13.125%.[xxxix]

S Corporations

Because an S corporation’s taxable income is computed in the same manner as an individual, and because an S corporation is treated as a partnership for purposes of the CFC rules, neither the 50-percent GILTI deduction nor the 80-percent deemed-paid credit apply to S corporations or their shareholders. Thus, individuals are treated more harshly by the GILTI inclusion rules than are C corporations.

What is an S Corp. to Do?

So what is an S corporation with a FC subsidiary to do when confronted with the foregoing challenges and the TCJA’s pro-C corporation bias?

C Corporation?

One option is for the S corporation to contribute its FC shares to a domestic C corporation, or the S corporation itself could convert into a C corporation (its shareholders may revoke its election, or the corporation may cease to qualify as a small business corporation by providing for a second class of stock or by admitting a non-qualifying shareholder).

However, C corporation status has its own significant issues (like double taxation), and should not be undertaken lightly, especially if the sale of the business is reasonably foreseeable.

Branch?

Another option is for the S corporation to effectively liquidate its foreign subsidiary and to operate in the foreign jurisdiction through a branch, or through an entity for which a “check-the-box election” may be made to disregard the entity for tax purposes.

This would avoid the CFC and GITLI rules entirely, and it would allow the shareholders of the S corporation to claim a credit for foreign taxes paid by the branch.

Of course, operating through a branch would also prevent any deferral of U.S. taxation of the foreign income, and may subject the U.S. person to a branch profits tax in the foreign jurisdiction.[xl]

It should be noted, however, that the liquidation or reorganization of a CFC into a branch will generally be a taxable event, with the result that the accumulated foreign earnings and profits of the CFC will be included in the income of the USS as a “deemed dividend.”

That being said, the rules for determining such accumulated earnings and profits generally exclude amounts previously included in the gross income of the USS under the CFC rules. To the extent any amount is not so excluded, the S corporation shareholder of the CFC will not be able to utilize the DRD to reduce its tax liability.[xli]

Section 962 Election?

Yet another option to consider – which pre-dates the TCJA, but which seems to have been under-utilized – is a special election that is available to an individual who is a USS, either directly or through an S corporation.

This election, which is made on annual basis, results in the individual being treated as a C corporation for purposes of determining the income tax on their share of GILTI and subpart F income; thus, the electing individual shareholder would be taxed at the corporate tax rate.[xlii]

The election also causes the individual to be treated as a C corporation for purposes of claiming the FTC attributable to this income; thus, they would be allowed the 80-percent deemed-paid credit.

Of course, like most elections, this one comes at a price. The E&P of a FC that are attributable to amounts which were included in the income of a USS under the GILTI or CFC rules, and with respect to which an election was made, shall be included in gross income, when such E&P are actually distributed to the USS, to the extent that the E&P so distributed exceed the amount of tax paid on the amounts to which such election applied.[xliii]

No Easy Way Out[xliv]

We find ourselves in a new regime for the U.S. taxation of foreign income, and there is still a lot of guidance to be issued.

In the meantime, an S corporation with a foreign subsidiary would be well-served to model out the consequences of the various options described above, taking into account its unique circumstances – including the possibility of a sale – before making any changes to the structure of its foreign operations.


[i] “TCJA”. Public Law No. 115-97.

[ii] These may be wholly-owned, or they may be partially-owned; the latter often represent a joint venture with a foreign business.

[iii] The “20% of qualified business income deduction” for pass-through entities does not apply to foreign-source income.

[iv] The Code provides sourcing rules for most categories of business income. It should be noted that, in certain cases, a foreign person that is engaged in a U.S. trade or business may have limited categories of foreign-source income that are considered to be effectively connected such U.S. trade or business.

[v] Special rules apply where the foreign subsidiary engages in business transactions with its U.S. parent or with another affiliated company. A basic U.S. tax principle applicable in dividing profits from transactions between related taxpayers is that the amount of profit allocated to each related taxpayer must be measured by reference to the amount of profit that a similarly situated taxpayer would realize in similar transactions with unrelated parties. The “transfer pricing rules” of section 482 seek to ensure that taxpayers do not shift income properly attributable to the U.S. to a related foreign company through pricing that does not reflect an arm’s-length result.

[vi] Noncitizens who are lawfully admitted as permanent residents of the U.S. (“green card holders”) are treated as residents for tax purposes. In addition, noncitizens who meet a “substantial presence test” (based upon the number of days spent in the U.S.) are also, generally speaking, taxable as U.S. residents.

[vii] It should be noted that an unincorporated entity, such as a partnership or limited liability company, may elect its classification for Federal tax purposes – as a disregarded entity, a partnership or an association – under the “check-the-box” regulations. See Treas. Reg. 301.7701-3.

[viii] The same goes for income that is treated as having been earned directly, as through a partnership. IRC Sec. 702(b).

[ix] The other main anti-deferral regime covers Passive Foreign Investment Companies (“PFIC”). There is some overlap between the CFC and PFIC regimes; the former trumps the latter.

[x] The TCJA amended the applicable ownership attribution rules so that certain stock of a FC owned by a foreign person is attributed to a related U.S. person for purposes of determining whether the related U.S. person is a USS of the FC and, therefore, whether the FC is a CFC. The pro rata share of a CFC’s subpart F income that a USS is required to include in gross income, however, continues to be determined based on direct or indirect ownership of the CFC, without application of the new downward attribution rule. In making this amendment, the TCJA intended to render ineffective certain transactions that were used to as a means of avoiding the CFC regime. One such transaction involved effectuating “de-control” of a foreign subsidiary, by taking advantage of the prior attribution rule that effectively turned off the constructive stock ownership rules when to do otherwise would result in a U.S. person being treated as owning stock owned by a foreign person.

[xi] The TCJA expanded the definition of USS under subpart F to include any U.S. person who owns 10 percent or more of the total value of shares of all classes of stock of a FC. Prior law looked only to voting power. The TCJA also eliminated the requirement that a FC must be controlled for an uninterrupted period of 30 days before subpart F inclusions apply.

[xii] The 10-percent U.S. shareholders of a CFC also are required to include currently in income for U.S. tax purposes their pro rata shares of the CFC’s untaxed earnings invested in certain items of U.S. property. This U.S. property generally includes tangible property located in the U.S. stock of a U.S. corporation, an obligation of a U.S. person, and certain intangible assets, such as patents and copyrights, acquired or developed by the CFC for use in the U.S. The inclusion rule for investment of earnings in U.S. property is intended to prevent taxpayers from avoiding U.S. tax on dividend repatriations by repatriating CFC earnings through non-dividend payments, such as loans to U.S. persons.

[xiii] Before the TCJA reduced the tax rate on C corporations to a flat 21 percent, that meant more than 90 percent of 35 percent, or 31.5 percent. The reduced corporate tax rate should make it easier for a CFC to satisfy this exception; 90% of 21% is 18.9%.

[xiv] This concept, as well as the basis-adjustment concept immediately below, should be familiar to anyone dealing with partnerships and S corporations.

[xv] In order to ensure that this previously-taxed foreign income is not taxed a second time upon distribution, a USS of a CFC generally receives a basis increase with respect to its stock in the CFC equal to the amount of the CFC’s earnings that are included in the USS’s income under the CFC regime. Conversely, a 10-percent U.S. shareholder of a CFC generally reduces its basis in the CFC’s stock in an amount equal to any distributions that the 10-percent U.S. shareholder receives from the CFC that are excluded from its income as previously taxed under subpart F.

[xvi] The deemed-paid credit is limited to the amount of foreign income taxes properly attributable to the subpart F inclusion. The foreign tax credit generally is limited to a taxpayer’s U.S. tax liability on its foreign-source taxable income. This limit is intended to ensure that the credit serves its purpose of mitigating double taxation of foreign-source income without offsetting U.S. tax on U.S.-source income.

[xvii] Basically, foreign earnings that were not previously taxed, that are not effectively connected to the conduct of a U.S. trade or business, and that are not subpart F income.

[xviii] Such entities must determine their post-1986 deferred foreign income based on the greater of the aggregate

post-1986 accumulated foreign earnings and profits as of November 2, 2017 or December 31,

[xix] The cash position of an entity consists of all cash, net accounts receivables, and the fair market value of similarly liquid assets, specifically including personal property that is actively traded on an established financial market, government securities, certificates of deposit, commercial paper, and short-term obligations.

[xx] It should be noted that the increase in income that is not taxed by reason of the deduction is treated as income that is exempt from tax for purposes of determining (i.e., increasing) a shareholder’s stock basis in an S corporation, but not as income exempt from tax for purposes of determining the accumulated adjustments account (“AAA”) of an S corporation (thus increasing the risk of a dividend from an S corporation with E&P from a C corporation).

[xxi] IRC Sec. 962. However, there are other consequences that stem from such an election that must be considered,

[xxii] The net tax liability that may be paid in installments is the excess of the USS’s net income tax for the taxable year in which the pre-effective-date undistributed CFC earnings are included in income over the taxpayer’s net income tax for that year determined without regard to the inclusion. https://www.taxlawforchb.com/?s=foreign

[xxiii] If a deficiency is determined that is attributable to an understatement of the net tax liability due under this provision, the deficiency is payable with underpayment interest for the period beginning on the date on which the net tax liability would have been due, without regard to an election to pay in installments, and ending with the payment of the deficiency.

[xxiv] The election to defer the tax is due not later than the due date for the return of the S corporation for its last taxable year that begins before January 1, 2018.

[xxv] Partial transfers trigger the end of deferral only with respect to the portion of tax properly allocable to the portion of stock sold.

[xxvi] Query how the shareholders’ agreement for an S corporation should be amended to address this possibility.

[xxvii] If an election to defer payment of the tax liability is in effect for a shareholder, that shareholder must report the amount of the deferred tax liability on each income tax return due during the period that the election is in effect. Failure to include that information with each income tax return will result in a penalty equal to five-percent of the amount that should have been reported.

[xxviii] In general, a “specified 10-percent owned foreign corporation” is any FC (other than a PFIC) with respect to which any domestic corporation is a USS.

[xxix] A distribution of previously-taxed income does not constitute a dividend, even if it reduced earnings and profits.

[xxx] The “dividends received deduction” (“DRD”).

[xxxi] In the case of the sale or exchange by a domestic corporation of stock in a FC held for one year or more, any amount received by the domestic corporation which is treated as a dividend for purposes of Code section 1248, is treated as a dividend for purposes of applying the provision. Thus, the DRD will be available to such a deemed dividend. Sec. 1248 is intended to prevent the conversion of subpart F income into capital gain.

[xxxii] In addition, the DRD is not available for any dividend received from a FC if the dividend is a “hybrid dividend.” A hybrid dividend is an amount received from a FC for which a DRD would otherwise be allowed and for which the specified-10-percent-owned FC received a deduction (or other tax benefit) with respect to any income taxes imposed by any foreign country.

[xxxiii] Of course, we also have to consider any withholding tax that the foreign country may impose of the foreign corporation’s dividend distribution to its S corporation shareholder. This tax will be creditable by the shareholders of the S corporation.

[xxxiv] For purposes of the GILTI inclusion, a person is treated as a U.S. shareholder of a CFC for any taxable year only if such person “owns” stock in the corporation on the last day, in such year, on which the corporation is a CFC. A corporation is generally treated as a CFC for any taxable year if the corporation is a CFC at any time during the taxable year.

[xxxv] Thus, subpart F income, effectively connected income, and income that is subject to foreign tax at a rate greater than 18.9% is not GILTI. For example, the corporate tax rate is 19% in the U.K., 24% in Italy, 25% in Spain 25%, 18% in Luxembourg, and 25% in the Netherlands.

[xxxvi] “Qualified business asset investment (“QBAI”). The CFC’s intangible property is not included in QBAI.

The 10% represents an arbitrary rate of return on the “unreturned capital” (i.e., tangible property) of the CFC, represented by its adjusted basis, for which continued deferral is permitted. Anything in excess thereof must be included in the gross income of the USS on a current basis.

[xxxvii] The maximum individual tax rate applicable to ordinary income.

[xxxviii] For taxable years beginning after December 31, 2025, the deduction is lowered to 37.5-percent.

It should be noted that it is intended that the “50-percent of GILTI deduction” be treated as exempting the deducted income from tax. Thus, for example, the deduction for GILTI could give rise to an increase in a domestic corporate partner’s basis in a domestic partnership that holds stock in a CFC.

[xxxix] 13.125% multiplied by 80% equals 10.5 percent.

[xl] Of course, an income tax treaty between the U.S. and the foreign jurisdiction may affect this result.

[xli] The applicable regulations have yet to be amended to reflect the changes made by the TCJA.

[xlii] However, the shareholder will not be allowed the 50-percent GILTI deduction. This deduction is not part of the CFC or FTC rules.

[xliii] In other words, the regular double taxation rules for C corporations will apply; the corporation is treated as having distributed its after-tax E&P.

[xliv] Remember “Rocky IV”?

Last week, we considered the U.S. taxation of a closely held foreign corporation that owned a minority interest in a partnership that was engaged in business in the U.S. This week, we turn our sights to the U.S. taxation of a domestic corporation that owned foreign corporate subsidiaries.

Policy Underlying the CFC Rules

In general, a U.S. person must include in its gross income its directly-earned income from foreign sources; thus, if a U.S. person operates a business through a branch located overseas, the net business income attributable to that branch is included in the U.S. person’s gross income.

Absent the so-called “Subpart F rules,” the inclusion of this foreign source income may be circumvented when the U.S. person chooses to operate overseas indirectly, through a controlled foreign corporation (“CFC”), rather than through a foreign branch. In that case, the foreign subsidiary corporation is generally treated as a separate taxpayer from its U.S. owner; the foreign-source income earned by the CFC is generally not included in the U.S. owner’s gross income; and the imposition of U.S. income tax on the foreign-source income earned by the CFC is deferred until it is repatriated by the CFC to the U.S.

Anti-deferral

That a U.S. person may defer the inclusion in its gross income of the foreign-source income earned by its controlled foreign corporate subsidiaries does not, in and of itself, violate any U.S. tax policy. However, Congress and the IRS have sought to defeat the deferral benefit in situations where certain “U.S. shareholders” may direct the flow of certain types of income (“Subpart F Income”) to a low-tax jurisdiction; for example, income earned in transactions between related corporations that are located in different countries, one of which is a tax haven. In those situations, the Code and the IRS’s regulations require the current inclusion of the CFC’s un-repatriated Subpart F Income in the U.S. shareholder’s gross income.

Deemed Repatriation

Although the current inclusion of Subpart F Income is a major concern of the Subpart F rules, they also seek to prevent the tax-free repatriation of other foreign income through investments in U.S. property. In general, the foreign-source income earned by a CFC (other than Subpart F Income) is subject to U.S. tax when the income is repatriated as a dividend. If the CFC, instead, invested the foreign-source income in the U.S., by the purchase of U.S.-situs property, or by a loan to the U.S. parent corporation, the foreign income would effectively be repatriated in a manner that would escape current U.S. tax.

In order to address this situation, the Code generally provides that certain “investments” by a CFC in U.S.-situs property will be treated as the repatriation of the CFC’s foreign-source income, as a result of which, the U.S. shareholder must include in its gross income an amount calculated by reference to the amount deemed to have been repatriated by the CFC.

A recent decision by the U.S. Tax Court considered the application of this deemed repatriation rule.

Investment in U.S. Property?

Taxpayer was a domestic “C” corporation and the parent of a group of domestic and foreign subsidiary corporations. The IRS determined that the CFCs had invested substantial amounts of untaxed foreign profits in “U.S. property”. Accordingly, the IRS determined that Taxpayer was required to include in its gross income the amounts that the CFCs had invested. As a result, the IRS asserted income tax deficiencies against the Taxpayer, and the Taxpayer petitioned the Tax Court for relief.

According to the IRS, Taxpayer’s CFCs made investments in U.S. property through the following transactions: (1) they extended loans to a domestic subsidiary, in the form of intercompany cash advances; and (2) one of them guaranteed of a loan that a domestic subsidiary had obtained from Foreign Bank.

Intercompany Loans

Taxpayer was the sole shareholder of US-Sub, a domestic corporation, which in turn was the sole shareholder of four CFCs. Taxpayer and US-Sub were U.S. shareholders of these CFCs because they owned (directly or indirectly) 100% of the total combined voting power of all classes of the CFCs’ stock.

At various times, the CFCs had made loans to US-Sub. Substantial balances on these loans remained outstanding throughout the tax periods at issue.

Guaranty Transaction

US-Sub also borrowed money from Foreign Bank. As a condition of extending credit, Foreign Bank required US-Sub to secure a guaranty for the loan, preferably from a subsidiary located in the same jurisdiction as Foreign Bank. One of Taxpayer’s CFCs (“F-Sub”) supplied the requisite guaranty.

US-Sub was also required to pledge as security for the Foreign Bank loan all the stocks that US-Sub then owned or thereafter acquired, including its equity interest in the CFCs.

The outstanding balance on the Foreign Bank loan remained constant throughout the tax periods at issue, as did F-Sub’s guaranty of the loan.

IRS Audit

Neither Taxpayer nor US-Sub had previously included in income, for any year, any portion of this outstanding loan balance.

Taxpayer filed consolidated Forms 1120, U.S. Corporation Income Tax Return, for the years at issue. The IRS examined Taxpayer’s returns and determined that the CFCs had held substantial investments in U.S. property, which Taxpayer had neglected to include in gross income; specifically, the IRS contended that Taxpayer’s CFCs held two sets of investments in U.S. property that Taxpayer was required to include in gross income: (1) the outstanding loan balances owed by US-Sub to the CFCs; and (2) F-Sub’s guaranty of the Foreign Bank loan to US-Sub. As a result, the IRS issued a notice of deficiency, and Taxpayer petitioned the Tax Court.

Governing Statutory Framework

A CFC is a foreign corporation more than 50% of whose stock (in terms of voting power or value) is owned (directly or constructively) by U.S. shareholders. A U.S. shareholder is a U.S. person who owns (directly or constructively) 10% or more of the total combined voting power of the foreign corporation’s stock.

In general, a U.S. shareholder owning CFC stock on the last day of the CFC’s taxable year must include in gross income the lesser of: (1) the excess of such shareholder’s pro rata share of the amount of U.S. property held by the CFC as of the close of such taxable year, over the amount of CFC profits otherwise included in such shareholder’s gross income; or (2) such shareholder’s pro rata share of the applicable earnings of such CFC.

“U.S. property” includes (among other things) an obligation of a U.S. person, such as a bond, note, or other indebtedness. According to IRS regulations, any obligation of a U.S. person with respect to which a CFC is a pledgor or guarantor is considered U.S. property held by the CFC. A CFC will be considered a guarantor if its assets serve at any time, even though indirectly, as security for the performance of an obligation of a U.S. person.

The amount of the investment with respect to an obligation of a U.S. person is the CFC’s adjusted basis in the obligation. In the case of a pledge or guaranty, the amount includible is based on the unpaid principal amount of the obligation with respect to which the CFC is the pledgor or guarantor. The amount includible is reduced by any previously taxed profits of the CFC, and it cannot exceed the U.S. shareholder’s pro rata share of the CFC’s earnings.

The Court’s Analysis

With respect to the loans made by Taxpayer’s CFCs to US-Sub, the Court found that substantial loan balances remained outstanding during the tax periods at issue. The Taxpayer asserted that some of the loans might have been “discharged,” but was unable to provide specific facts supporting its claim.

Thus, the Court concluded that the intercompany loan balance owed by US-Sub to each CFC constituted U.S. property held by that CFC, and that the Taxpayer was required to include in gross income, subject to the net profits of the CFCs.

CFC as Guarantor and as Pledgor

The Court next turned to US-Sub’s loan from Foreign Bank. This loan had a substantial outstanding balance during the periods at issue, and F-Sub’s guarantee of the loan remained in place throughout these periods. Neither Taxpayer nor US-Sub had previously included in income, for any year, any portion of this outstanding loan balance.

The IRS contended that F-Sub, as a guarantor of the Foreign Bank loan, was considered as holding the obligation of a U.S. person. The IRS accordingly concluded that the unpaid principal balance of that loan was includible in Taxpayer’s gross income.

Although F-Sub’s status as a guarantor would have been sufficient to support inclusion in Taxpayer’s gross income, F-Sub also appeared to have been a pledgor in support of the Foreign Bank loan. A CFC will be regarded as a pledgor if its assets serve directly or indirectly as “security for the performance of an obligation” of a U.S. person.

According to IRS regulations, the pledge by a U.S. shareholder of stock of a CFC will be considered as the indirect pledge of the CFC’s assets if at least two-thirds of the total combined voting power of all classes of CFC stock is pledged, and if the pledge of stock is accompanied by one or more negative covenants or similar restrictions on the shareholder effectively limiting the corporation’s discretion with respect to the disposition of assets and the incurrence of liabilities other than in the ordinary course of business.

Because US-Sub was required to pledge to Foreign Bank its 100% stock ownership interest in the CFCs, including F-Sub, F-Sub was treated as having pledged all of the assets which it then held or thereafter acquired. To the extent that this pledge effectively limited US-Sub’s discretion with respect to the disposition of F-Sub’s assets and the incurrence of liabilities, the Foreign Bank loan contained “negative covenants or similar restrictions,” that rendered F-Sub an indirect pledgor as well as a guarantor.

Financial Condition of CFC?

Taxpayer argued that F-Sub’s guaranty had little or no value, and represented a “meaningless gesture.” According to Taxpayer, S-Sub’s guaranty furnished only a secondary form of collateral that provided no incremental security for Foreign Bank.

The Court failed to see the relevance of this argument. A CFC, it stated, is considered as holding an obligation of a U.S. person if the CFC “is a pledgor or guarantor of such obligation.” That is the end of the inquiry, the Court said; neither the Code nor the regulations issued thereunder inquire into the relative importance that the creditor attaches to the guarantee.

In any event, the Court continued, Taxpayer failed to offer any facts to support its assertion. Foreign Bank demanded a guaranty from a company with assets in Foreign Bank’s location, and F-Sub provided that guarantee. When a bank agrees to make a substantial loan only after securing a guaranty from a local company with local assets, it is logical to assume that the bank regarded that guaranty as valuable security.

Alternatively, Taxpayer asserted that F-Sub’s guaranty was worthless because other liabilities encumbering F-Sub’s assets exceeded the fair market value of those assets at the time F-Sub guaranteed the loan.

The Court, however, observed that Taxpayer did not supply any balance sheets, income statements, or other documentation concerning F-Sub’s financial position or its insolvency. Moreover, F-Sub’s guaranty remained in place continuously, and Taxpayer did not provide any documents suggesting that Foreign Bank ever questioned the value of F-Sub’s collateral or demanded additional security.

In any event, the Court stated, it was not clear that a CFC’s financial condition is even relevant in determining whether its guaranty gives rise to an investment in U.S. property. The Code provides that a CFC shall be considered as holding an obligation of a U.S. person if such CFC is a pledgor or guarantor of such obligation. The regulations provide that any obligation of a U.S. person with respect to which a CFC is a pledgor or guarantor shall be considered U.S. property held by the CFC. They make no reference to the likelihood that the CFC will be called upon, or will be able, to make good on its guarantee. According to the Court, this reflects the common sense proposition that a lender would not ask for, or be satisfied with, a guarantee from a person who lacked the financial capacity to provide the security that the lender desires.

For these reasons, the Court concluded that F-Sub’s guarantee of the Foreign Bank loan gave rise to an investment in U.S. property and, subject to F-Sub’s earnings and profits, Taxpayer was required to include in gross income for the years at issue the outstanding balance of the Foreign Bank loan.

Takeaway

Many closely held U.S. businesses have realized that there are ample opportunities for growth and profits overseas. In pursuing such opportunities, however, a U.S. taxpayer must be mindful of the complex rules that apply in determining the taxation of overseas profits – including the Subpart F rules, discussed above – and the reporting thereof.

With an understanding of these rules, and with the guidance of knowledgeable advisers, a U.S. taxpayer may be able to structure its overseas investments, and the repatriation of its overseas earnings, in a more tax efficient manner.

Where business exigencies are such that a less than ideal tax structure has to be employed, the U.S. taxpayer must at least be able to account for the additional tax cost in analyzing the economic prospects and anticipated returns of its overseas investments and operations.