Ah, December

As we near the end of the taxable year ending December 31, 2017, the thoughts of most people turn to holidays and family gatherings, feasting and celebrations, and reflecting, perhaps, on another year gone-by.

Not so for tax professionals.

Instead of “visions of sugar plums” dancing in their heads, these poor folk dream of proposed legislation, obsess over the effective dates of regulations, struggle to close year-end transactions and to implement last-minute tax planning, and prepare for the upcoming tax filing season.

Speaking of tax filings, there is a new filing obligation that should be of interest to U.S. tax professionals who advise foreigners with U.S. investments or U.S. business interests. This filing requirement went into effect for taxable years beginning on or after January 1st of 2017; thus, the first returns to be filed under the new requirement will be due in early 2018.

Specifically, if a domestic LLC is wholly-owned by one foreign person, and it is otherwise treated as a disregarded entity for tax purposes, then the LLC must comply with certain reporting and record maintenance requirements that were previously limited to foreign-owned U.S. corporations.

Entity Classification

In general, a business entity with two or more members is treated, for tax purposes, as either a corporation or a partnership, and a business entity with a single owner is treated as either a corporation or an entity disregarded as separate from its owner (“disregarded entity”).

Certain domestic business entities, such as LLCs, are classified by default as partnerships (if they have more than one owner) or as disregarded entities (if they have only one owner), but are eligible to elect for federal tax purposes to be classified as corporations.

Some disregarded entities are not obligated to file a return or to obtain an employer identification number. According to the IRS, the absence of a return filing obligation (and the associated record maintenance requirements), made it difficult for the IRS to implement and enforce the tax laws applicable to foreigners that invest, or operate a business, in the U.S. through as disregarded entity.

Information Reporting

Under the Code, a domestic corporation that is at least 25% foreign-owned (a “reporting corporation”) is subject to specific information reporting and record maintenance requirements.

A reporting corporation is required to file an annual return on IRS Form 5472, Information Return of a 25% Foreign-Owned U.S. Corporation or a Foreign Corporation Engaged in a U.S. Trade or Business, with respect to each “related party” (including, among others, the 25%-foreign shareholder) with which the reporting corporation has had any “reportable transactions” including, for example, sales, leases, services, rentals, licenses, and loans.

The Form 5472 for a tax year must be attached to the reporting corporation’s income tax return for such year by the due date (including extensions) of the return. A separate Form 5472 must be filed for each foreign or domestic related party with which the reporting corporation had a reportable transaction during the tax year.

The reporting corporation must also keep books and records that are sufficient to establish the accuracy of the federal income tax return of the corporation, including information, documents, or records to the extent they may be relevant to determine the correct U.S. tax treatment of its transactions with related parties.

An Issue for the IRS

When a foreign-owned entity, such as an LLC, was classified as a corporation or a partnership for tax purposes, general ownership and accounting information was available to the IRS through the return filing and EIN application requirements.

Before 2017, however, when a single-member, foreign-owned, domestic LLC was treated as a disregarded entity for tax purposes, it was generally not subject to a separate income or information return filing requirement. Its owner was treated as owning directly the entity’s assets and liabilities, and the information available with respect to the disregarded entity depended on the foreign owner’s own return filings, if any were required.

Thus, if the LLC was wholly-owned by a foreign corporation, foreign partnership, or nonresident alien individual, generally no U.S. income or information return would have been required if neither the disregarded LLC nor its owner received any U.S. source income or was engaged in a U.S. trade or business.

Moreover, if the disregarded entity only received certain types of U.S. source income, such as portfolio interest or U.S. source income that was fully withheld upon at source, its foreign owner would not have had a U.S. return filing requirement.

The IRS found that even in cases when the disregarded entity had an EIN, as well as in cases when income earned through a disregarded entity had to be reported on its owner’s return (for example, income from a U.S. trade or business), it could be difficult for the IRS to associate the income with the disregarded entity based solely on the owner’s return.

The absence of specific return filing, and associated recordkeeping, requirements for foreign-owned, single-member domestic entities, and the resulting lack of ready access to information on ownership of, and transactions involving, these entities, made it difficult for the IRS to ascertain whether the entity or its owner was liable for any federal tax.

New Reporting Obligation

Thus, at the end of 2016, the IRS adopted a new regulation under which a domestic LLC, that is wholly-owned (directly, or indirectly through one or more other disregarded entities) by one foreign person, is treated as a domestic corporation (i.e., as an entity that is separate from its owner) for the limited purposes of the reporting and record maintenance requirements (including the associated procedural compliance requirements) described above. Importantly, it does not alter the framework of the existing entity classification regulations, including the treatment of certain LLCs as disregarded for income tax purposes.

By treating an affected LLC as a foreign-owned domestic corporation, the LLC becomes a “reporting corporation.” Consequently, it is required to file a Form 5472 information return with respect to any “reportable transactions” between the LLC and its foreign owner or other foreign “related parties” (transactions that would have been regarded under general U.S. tax principles if the entity had been, in fact, a corporation for U.S. tax purposes) including, for example, sales, leases, services, rentals, licenses, and loans. It is also required to maintain records sufficient to establish the accuracy of the information return and the correct U.S. tax treatment of such transactions. In addition, because the foreign-owned LLC has a filing obligation, it is required to obtain an EIN.

To ensure that a wholly-owned LLC reports all of its transactions with its foreign owner and other related parties, even if its foreign owner already has an obligation to report the income resulting from those transactions (for example, transactions resulting in income effectively connected with the conduct of a U.S. trade or business), the regulations specify, as an additional reportable category of transaction, any transaction to the extent not already covered by another reportable category. Thus, for example, contributions and distributions (both current and liquidating) are considered reportable transactions with respect to a “reporting LLC.”

Accordingly, any transaction between such an LLC and its foreign owner (or another disregarded entity of the same owner) would be considered a reportable transaction for purposes of the reporting and record maintenance requirements, even though, because the transaction involves a disregarded entity, it generally would not be considered a transaction for other tax purposes.

In order to facilitate the implementation of this reporting requirement, the reporting LLC is treated as having the same taxable year as its foreign owner, if the foreign owner has a U.S. return filing obligation. If the foreign owner has no U.S. return filing obligation, then the LLC is treated as having the calendar year as its taxable year.

Penalties

The penalty provisions associated with the failure to file the Form 5472 and the failure to maintain records will apply to reporting LLCs. For example, a penalty of $10,000 will be assessed against any reporting LLC that fails to file Form 5472 when due. The penalty also applies for a failure to maintain records as required. If the failure continues for more than 90 days after notification by the IRS, additional penalties will apply.

What Does It Mean?

Ah, the beginning of a new taxable year, and of a new era of transparency for many foreign-owned LLCs. What is one to do?

For starters, the U.S. professionals who advise these entities and their owners should alert them of the new reporting requirements, if they haven’t already done so. They should also be on the lookout for new Form 5472 instructions.

If a reporting LLC does not already have one, it must obtain an EIN as soon as possible. In connection therewith, the LLC will have to identify its “responsible party” (basically, the individual who controls the disposition of the LLC’s funds and assets), which means that the responsible party will itself have to obtain its own U.S. identification number (for example, an ITIN).

In addition, the LLC, its foreign owner, and their U.S. advisers will have to make certain that they have properly documented their 2017 reportable transactions, have maintained sufficient records to substantiate the accuracy of the information return to be filed by the LLC, and have implemented the appropriate internal procedures to ensure future compliance with the new reporting requirement.

Choice of Entity

One of the first decisions – and certainly among the most important – that the owner of a new business must make is the form of legal entity through which the business will be operated. This seemingly simple choice, which is too often made without adequate reflection, can have far-reaching tax and, therefore, economic consequences for the owner.

The well-advised owner will choose a form of entity for his business only after having considered a number of tax-related factors, including the income taxation of the entity itself, the income taxation of the entity’s owners, and the imposition of other taxes that may be determined by reference to the income generated by, or withdrawn from, the entity.

In addition to taxes, the owner will have considered the rights given to her, the protections afforded her (the most important being that of limited exposure for the debts and liabilities of the entity), and the responsibilities imposed upon her, pursuant to the state laws under which a business entity may be formed.

The challenge presented for the owner and her advisers is to identify the relevant tax and non-tax factors, analyze and (to the extent possible) quantify them, weigh them against one another, and then see if the best tax and business options may be reconciled within a single form of legal or business entity.

The foregoing may be interpreted as requiring a business owner, in all instances, to select one form of business entity over another; specifically, the creation of a corporation (taxable as a “C” or as an “S” corporation) over an LLC (taxable as a partnership or as a disregarded entity) as a matter of state law. Fortunately, that is not always the case. In order to understand why this is so, a brief review of the IRS’s entity classification rules is in order.

The Classification Regulations

A business entity that is formed as a “corporation” under a state’s corporate law – for example, under New York’s business corporation law – is classified as a corporation per se for tax purposes.

In general, a business entity that is not thereby classified as a corporation – such as an LLC – can elect its classification for federal tax purposes.

An entity with at least two members can elect to be classified as either a corporation (“association” is the term used by the IRS) or a partnership, and an entity with a single owner can elect to be classified as a corporation or to be disregarded as an entity separate from its owner.

Default Classification

Unless the entity elects otherwise, a domestic entity is classified as a partnership for tax purposes if it has two or more members; or it is disregarded as an entity separate from its owner if it has a single owner. Thus, an LLC with at least two members is treated as a partnership for tax purposes, while an LLC with only one member is disregarded for tax purposes, and its sole member is treated as owning all of the LLC’s assets, liabilities, and items of income, deduction, and credit.

Election to Change Tax Status

If a business entity classified as a partnership elects to be classified as a corporation, the partnership is treated, for tax purposes, as contributing all of its assets and liabilities to the corporation in exchange for stock in the corporation, and immediately thereafter, the partnership liquidates by distributing the stock of the corporation to its partners.

If an entity that is disregarded as an entity separate from its owner elects to be classified as a corporation, the owner of the entity is treated as contributing all of the assets and liabilities of the entity to the corporation in exchange for stock of the corporation.

An election is necessary only when an entity chooses to be classified initially (upon it creation) as other than its default classification, or when an entity chooses to change its classification. An entity whose classification is determined under the default classification retains that classification until the entity makes an election to change that classification.

In order to change its classification, a business entity must file IRS Form 8832, Entity Classification Election. Thus, an entity that is formed as an LLC or as a partnership under state law may file Form 8832 to elect to be treated as a corporation for tax purposes.

Alternatively, an LLC or a partnership that timely elects to be an S corporation (by filing IRS Form 2553) is treated as having made an election to be classified as a corporation, provided that it meets all other requirements to qualify as a small business corporation as of the effective date of the election.

Electing S Corporation Status – Why?

Most tax advisers will recommend that a new business be formed as an LLC that is taxable as a pass-through entity (either a partnership or a disregarded entity). The LLC does not pay entity level tax; its net income is taxed only to its members; in general, it may distribute in-kind property to its members without triggering recognition of gain; it may pass through to its members any deductions or losses attributable to entity-level indebtedness; it can provide for many classes of equity participation; it is not limited in the types of person who may own interests in the LLC; and it provides limited liability protection for its owners.

In light of these positive traits, why would an LLC elect to be treated as an S corporation? Yes, an S corporation, like an LLC, is not subject to entity-level income tax (in most cases), but what about the restrictive criteria for qualifying as an S corporation? An S corporation is defined as a domestic corporation that does not: have more than 100 shareholders, have as a shareholder a person who is not an individual (other than an estate, or certain trusts), have a nonresident alien as a shareholder, and have more than one class of stock.

The answer lies, in no small part, in the application of the self-employment tax.

Self-Employment Tax

The Code imposes a tax on the “self-employment income” of every individual for a taxable year (self-employment tax). In general, self-employment income is defined as “the net earnings from self-employment derived by an individual.”

“Net earnings from self-employment” is defined as the gross income derived by an individual from any trade or business carried on by such individual, less allowable deductions which are attributable to such trade or business, plus his distributive share (whether or not distributed) of income or loss from any trade or business carried on by a partnership of which he is a member . . . .”

Certain items are excluded from self-employment income, including “the distributive share of any item of income . . . of a limited partner.”

That being said, any guaranteed payments made to a limited partner for services actually rendered to or on behalf of the partnership, “to the extent that those payments are established to be in the nature of remuneration for those services . . . ,” are subject to the tax.

In creating the exclusion for limited partners, Congress recognized that certain earnings were basically in the nature of a return on investment. The “limited partner exclusion” was intended to apply to those partners who “merely invest” in, rather than those who actively participate in and perform services for, a partnership in their capacity as partners.

A partnership cannot change the character of a partner’s distributive share for purposes of the self-employment tax simply by making guaranteed payments to the partner for his services. A partnership is not a corporation and the “wage” and “reasonable compensation” rules which are applicable to corporations do not apply to partnerships.

Instead, a partner who is not a “limited partner” within the meaning of the exclusion is subject to self-employment tax on his full distributive share of the partnership’s income, even in cases involving a capital-intensive business.

Thus, individual partners who are not limited partners are subject to self-employment tax on their distributive share of partnership income regardless of their participation in the partnership’s business or the capital-intensive nature of the partnership’s business.

Unfortunately, the Code does not define the term “limited partner,” though the IRS and the courts have, on occasion, interpreted the term as applied to the members of an LLC; specifically, based upon these interpretations, the level of a member’s involvement in the management and operation of the LLC will be determinative of her status as a “limited partner” and, consequently, of her liability for self-employment tax.

S Corporations

The shareholders of an S corporation, on the other hand, are not subject to employment taxes in respect of any return on their investment in the corporation – i.e., on their pro rata share of S corporation income – though they are subject to employment taxes as to any wages paid to them by the corporation.

For that reason, the IRS has sought to compel S corporations to pay their shareholder-employees a reasonable wage for services rendered to the corporation. In that way, the IRS hopes to prevent an S corporation from “converting” what is actually compensation for services into a distribution of investment income that is not subject to employment taxes.

Why Not Incorporate?

If the self-employment tax on an owner’s share of business income can be legitimately avoided by operating through an S corporation – except to the extent it is paid out as reasonable compensation for services rendered by the owner to the corporation – why wouldn’t the owner just form a corporation through which to operate the business?

The answer is rather straightforward: because tax planning, although a very important consideration, is not necessarily the determinative factor in the choice-of-entity decision.

There may be other, non-tax business reasons, including factors under state law, for establishing a business entity other than a corporation.

For example, in the absence of a shareholders’ agreement – which under the circumstances may not be attainable – shares of stock in a corporation will generally be freely transferable, as a matter of state law; on the other hand, the ability of a transferee of an ownership interest in an LLC to become a full member will generally be limited under state law – in most cases, the transferee of a membership interest in an LLC will, in the absence of a contrary provision in the LLC’s operating agreement, become a mere assignee of the economic benefits associated with the membership interest, with none of the rights attendant on full membership in the LLC.

With that in mind – along with other favorable default rules under a state’s LLC law, as opposed to its corporate law – and recognizing the limitations imposed under the Code for qualification as an S corporation, a business owner may decide to form her entity as an LLC in order to take advantage of the “benefits” provided under state law; but she will also elect to treat the LLC as an S corporation for tax purposes so as to avoid entity-level income tax and to limit her exposure to self-employment tax.

In this way, the business owner may be able to reconcile her tax and non-tax business preferences within a single legal entity. The key, of course, will be for both the owner and her tax advisers to remain vigilant in the treatment of the LLC as an S corporation. The pass-through treatment for tax purposes will be easy to remember, but other tax rules applicable to corporations (such as the treatment of in-kind distributions as sales by the corporation), and to S corporations in particular (such as the single class of stock rule), will require greater attention, lest the owner inadvertently cause a taxable event or cause the LLC to lose its “S” status.

What is It?
It is a frequently recurring issue for those who advise the owners of rental real property, but one that is rarely raised by the owners themselves: does the ownership arrangement constitute a partnership for income tax purposes?

The question appears to be fairly straightforward – just ask any client. “We haven’t executed a partnership agreement, “ they may say, or “we haven’t filed a certificate of limited partnership, or articles of organization.” Therefore, there is no partnership.

Alternatively, they may respond that they have been filing partnership tax returns for years, on which they have been reporting the rental income and associated expenses of the “partnership.” Thus, there is a partnership.

Too often, the taxpayer-owners discover the likely consequences of their actions late in the game, when it may be difficult to redress any problems.

Why Does It Matter?
Taxpayers may be bound by the form of their agreed-upon ownership arrangement, if such form benefits the IRS.

On the other hand, the IRS is free to consider the facts and circumstances surrounding the ownership and operation of the real property for purposes of determining whether the ownership arrangement should be re-characterized as a partnership for tax purposes.

The availability of such facts and circumstances necessarily implies a history of dealings among the owners with respect to the property, on the basis of which the existence of a partnership may be determined. When this happens, it will usually be the case that the owners did not “intend” to form a tax partnership, and failed to consult with a tax adviser before engaging in such dealings.

As a result, taxpayers who believed they owned a TIC interest, the proceeds from the sale of which could be used to acquire replacement property as part of a like-kind exchange, instead find that what they owned was a partnership interest the sale of which does not qualify for like kind exchange treatment.

Fortunately, for the well-advised client, his or her adviser will be familiar with the factors on which the IRS has historically relied in establishing the existence of a partnership. Of course, this knowledge will only benefit the client if he or she consults the adviser before getting into trouble.

A recent IRS ruling describes a complex business arrangement that must have concerned the taxpayer and its advisers enough to lead them to seek the “opinion” of the IRS. [PLR 201622008]

Specifically, the taxpayer requested a ruling that undivided fractional interests in a property were not interests in a partnership for purposes of qualifying the undivided fractional interests as eligible relinquished property under the like kind exchange rules.

The Facts
Taxpayer was a business entity that owned 100% of the fee title to Property. Taxpayer operated Property as a commercial rental property.

Taxpayer triple net leased Property to an unrelated third party (“Co-Owner”). Taxpayer represented that the lease for the Property was a bona fide lease for tax purposes and that the rent due under the lease reflected the fair market value (“FMV”) for the use of Property. Further, Taxpayer represented that the rent under the lease was not determined, in whole or in part, based on the income or profits derived by any person from Property.

Contemporaneously with the triple net lease, Taxpayer and Co-Owner entered into an Option Agreement under which Taxpayer had an option to sell any or all of its interest in Property to Co-Owner at any time before the fifth anniversary of the effective date of the Option Agreement (the “Put”). If Taxpayer exercised the Put with respect to a part of its interest in Property, it could exercise the Put again with respect to another part of its interest in Property and continue to do so until all interests in Property were transferred or the Put expired.

Under the Option Agreement, Co-Owner had an option to acquire the entire remaining interest then held by Taxpayer beginning on the seventh anniversary of the effective date of the Option Agreement, and ending X days later (the “Call”).

The purchase price for the exercise of the Put or the Call would be based on the FMV of Property at the time of the execution of the Option Agreement, increased at each anniversary date of such execution by Y% of the then-current exercise price, as increased by any prior Y% increases. Taxpayer represented that Y% was a reasonable appreciation factor for Property.

Within six months of executing the triple net lease and the Option Agreement, Taxpayer could exercise its right under the Put to sell a Z% tenancy-in-common (“TIC”) interest in the Property to Co-Owner. Taxpayer represented that neither co-owner would provide financing to the other to acquire a TIC interest in the Property.

When Taxpayer sold the Z% TIC interest to Co-Owner, Taxpayer and Co-Owner would either (i) refinance the existing indebtedness encumbering the Property by borrowing from an unrelated lender and creating a blanket lien on the Property, or (ii) cause the debt agreement to be amended to provide that the lien was a blanket lien and that the cost would be shared proportionately. Each co-owner would share the indebtedness on Property in proportion to that co-owner’s interest in Property.

Property would be owned by the Taxpayer and Co-Owner pursuant to a TIC agreement (the “Co-Ownership Agreement”) that would run with the land. Taxpayer represented that Taxpayer and Co-Owner would not file a partnership or corporate tax return, conduct business under a common name, execute an agreement identifying the co-owners as members of a business entity, or otherwise hold themselves out as members of a business entity. The Co-Ownership Agreement would be consistent with these representations.

Under the Co-Ownership Agreement: any sale or lease of all or a portion of Property, any negotiation or renegotiation of indebtedness secured by a blanket lien, and the hiring of a manager, required the unanimous approval of the co-owners; all actions not otherwise required to be taken by unanimous consent would require the vote of co-owners holding more than 50 percent of the undivided interests in Property; there would be no buy-sell agreement; there would be no waiver of partition rights among co-owners unless required by the lender; a co-owner would be free to partition its interest in Property unless prohibited by the lender; a co-owner would be able to create a lien upon its own interest without the agreement or approval of any person, subject to the terms of the Co-Ownership Agreement, provided it did not create a lien on any other co-owner’s interest; in the event Property was sold or refinanced, each co-owner would receive its percentage interest in the net proceeds from the sale or refinancing of Property; upon the sale of Property, the co-owners would have to satisfy any blanket lien encumbering Property in proportion to their respective interests in Property; the Taxpayer and the Co-Owner would share in all revenues generated by Property and have an obligation to pay all costs associated with Property in proportion to their respective interests in Property; if either co-owner advanced funds necessary to pay expenses associated with Property, the other co-owner would have to repay such advance within 30 days of the date the expense, obligation, or liability was paid; to secure such an advance repayment obligation, each co-owner would grant each other co-owner a lien against such granting co-owner’s interest in Property and the rents and income therefrom and the leases thereof.

Taxpayer represented that the co-owners could, but were not required to, enter into a management agreement with Manager. The Co-Ownership Agreement would provide that the term of any management agreement entered into by the co-owners would be for one year, and would be automatically renewed for one-year periods unless either the Manager or any co-owner otherwise gave timely written notice to the other parties prior to the then-current expiration date.

Any such management agreement would: authorize the Manager to maintain a common bank account for the collection and deposit of rents and to offset expenses associated with Property against any revenues before disbursing each co-owner’s share of net revenues; provide that the Manager disburse the co-owner’s share of net revenues from Property within three months from the date of receipt of those revenues (subject to holding back reserves for anticipated expenses of Property, with each co-owner’s share of such reserves being proportionate to that co-owner’s interest in Property); authorize the Manager to prepare statements for the co-owners showing their shares of revenue and costs from Property; authorize the Manager to obtain or modify insurance on Property, and to negotiate modifications of the terms of any lease or any indebtedness encumbering Property, subject to the approval of the co-owners; provide that the fees paid by the co-ownership to the Manager would not depend in whole or in part on the income or profits derived from Property, and would not exceed the FMV of the Manager’s services.

Taxpayer represented that the activities of the Manager in managing Property would not result in non-customary services with respect to Property, taking into account the activities of the co-owners’ agents and any person related to the co-owners with respect to Property.

Taxpayer represented that the Co-Owner would acquire its interest in Property through the use of its own capital or through funds from an unrelated lender. Taxpayer also represented that, when the Put or Call was exercised, the Co-Owner would be required to pay the full purchase price of the interest in cash.

A Separate Entity?
Whether an organization is an entity separate from its owners for federal tax purposes is a matter of federal tax law and does not depend on whether the organization is recognized as an entity under local law.

A joint venture or other contractual arrangement may create a separate entity for federal tax purposes if the participants carry on a trade, business, financial operation, or venture, and divide the profits therefrom, but the mere co-ownership of property that is maintained, kept in repair, and rented or leased does not constitute a separate entity for federal tax purposes.

The term “partnership” includes any joint venture or other unincorporated organization through or by means of which any business, financial operation, or venture is carried on, and which is not, within the meaning of the Code, a corporation, trust or estate.

The IRS has enumerated certain conditions under which it would consider ruling that an undivided fractional interest in rental real property is not an interest in a business entity for federal tax purposes. The conditions relate to, among other things, TIC ownership of the property, number of co-owners, no treatment of the co-ownership as an entity, co-ownership agreements, voting by co-owners, restrictions on alienation, sharing of proceeds and liabilities upon sale of the property, proportionate sharing of profits and losses, proportionate sharing of debt, options, no business activities by the co-owners, management agreements, leasing agreements, and loan agreements.

TIC or Partnership?
The IRS determined that the Co-Ownership Agreement and Management Agreement would satisfy all of the conditions set forth above.

Regarding the condition that a co-owner may not acquire a put option to sell the co-owner’s undivided interest to another co-owner, the IRS distinguished the facts in the ruling, stating that the Put would not cause the fractional interests in Property to constitute interests in a business entity. The Taxpayer’s Put was not an option to sell an existing undivided interest that was previously acquired by the Taxpayer. Rather, the put option was an option to sell property held by the Taxpayer prior to entering into the proposed transaction.

Regarding the exercise price, and the requirement that the exercise price be the FMV at the time of exercise, the IRS found that the Y% appreciation factor adequately approximated the FMV of Property.

Regarding business activities, the IRS stated that the co-owners’ activities must be limited to those customarily performed in connection with the maintenance and repair of rental real property. Activities will be treated as “customary activities” for this purpose if the activities would not prevent the amount received from qualifying only as rent, as opposed to compensation (in part) for services. In determining the co-owners’ activities, all activities of the co-owners, their agents, and any persons related to the co-owners with respect to the property are taken into account, whether or not those activities are performed by the co-owners in their capacities as co-owners.

The Taxpayer represented that the co-owners’ activities with respect to Property, conducted directly or through the Manager, would be limited to customary activities.

Based on the foregoing, the IRS concluded that, if Taxpayer sold a TIC interest in Property to Co-Owner, an undivided fractional interest in Property would not constitute an interest in a business entity for purposes of qualifying the undivided fractional interests as eligible relinquished property under the like-kind exchange rules.

Before You Act
Of course, there may be good business reasons for using an LLC; for example, a lender may require the use of a single business entity to hold the real property, or the business relationship among the owners may be such that the terms of a mere TIC agreement will not suffice.

However, it bears repeating: the mere co-ownership of real property that is maintained, kept in repair, and rented does not constitute a partnership for tax purposes. Too often, such an arrangement is formed as an LLC and is thereby treated as a partnership for tax purposes, subject to the rules and limitations applicable to such business entities.

Under certain conditions, however, an unincorporated organization may be excluded from the application of all or a part of the partnership rules. Such an organization must be availed of for investment purposes only and not for the active conduct of a business. The members of such organization must be able to compute their income without the necessity of computing partnership taxable income.

Where the participants in the joint purchase, retention, sale, or exchange of investment property: own the property as co-owners; reserve the right separately to take or dispose of their shares of any property acquired or retained; and do not actively conduct business or irrevocably authorize some person acting in a representative capacity to purchase, sell, or exchange such investment property, then such group may elect to be excluded from the application of the partnership tax rules.

Any such unincorporated organization that wishes to be excluded from these rules must elect not later than the time prescribed (including extensions thereof) for filing the partnership return for the first taxable year for which exclusion from the partnership rules is desired.