Once Upon A Time

I recently recalled a client that was referred to us a few years back, shortly before it was acquired by a larger company. The client was closely held by U.S. individuals and by an S corporation, and was organized as a Delaware LLC that was treated as a partnership for U.S.

Yesterday, in Part I, we reviewed the like-kind exchange rules. https://www.taxlawforchb.com/2019/04/deferring-real-property-gain-like-kind-exchange-or-opportunity-fund-part-i/

Now we turn to the new kid on the block.

Qualified Opportunity Zones

The Act added Section 1400Z-2 to the Code, which allows a taxpayer to elect to temporarily defer the recognition of gain from the disposition of property which is reinvested in a

Committed to a Zone

Last week’s post[i] considered how the newly-enacted qualified opportunity zone (“QOZ”) rules seek to encourage investment and stimulate economic growth in certain distressed communities by providing various federal income tax benefits to taxpayers who invest in businesses that operate within these zones.[ii] After describing these tax incentives, the post

Tax Law for the Closely Held Business blog authors Lou Vlahos and Bernadette Kasnicki presented yesterday, January 17, on how the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act affects not-for-profit organizations. Their presentation–given at the 41st Annual New York State Society Certified Public Accountants (NYSSCPA) Not-for-Profit Conference in New York City–was summarized in article format for

The Business-Charity Connection

As our readers know, this blog is dedicated to addressing the tax-related business and succession planning issues that are most often encountered by the owners of a closely held business. Occasionally, however, we have crossed over into the space occupied by tax-exempt charitable organizations inasmuch as such an exempt organization (“EO”) may

If there was one part of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“TCJA”) that estate planners were especially pleased to see, it was the increase in the basic exclusion amount from $5.49 million, in 2017, to $11.18 million for gifts made, and decedents dying, in 2018.[i] However, many estate planners failed to appreciate the