“When will they ever learn?”

No, I am not channeling Seeger. I am referring to those individuals[i] who continue to acquire real property (“RP”) in, or who contribute RP to, corporations. In just the last couple of months, I have encountered taxpayers who want to remove RP from the closely held corporations in which

Missed Part I?  Check it out here!

“Related Party” Transactions
Transfer Pricing

Valuations figure prominently in determining the proper tax treatment of transactions – such as sales, loans, leases, and performance of services – between related taxpayers, including, for example, commonly-controlled business entities.

The IRS is authorized to allocate items of income or deduction, or

One word: “taxes.” There are so many transactions in which the tax consequences visited upon a closely-held business and its owners, and, therefore the true economic cost of the transaction, will depend upon the valuation of the business, its property, or its equity.

The following discussion highlights some of the more commonly-encountered situations in which

A Continuing Investment

In the last two posts, we saw how a Taxpayer who transfers Property A to a partnership (“Partnership”) in exchange for an equity interest therein will not be required to recognize the gain realized on the transfer. This gain will not be included in Taxpayer’s gross income because Taxpayer is viewed under

Contributing Property to A Partnership

When a taxpayer (“Taxpayer”) sells a property (“Property”) with a fair market value (“FMV”) in excess of Taxpayer’s basis in Property in exchange for cash in an arm’s-length transaction, the amount of gain that he realizes on the sale is measured by the difference between the amount of cash received

“Tax free” – two words that often bring great delight when they are spoken by a tax adviser to the owner of a business, whether he is considering the disposition of a single asset, or of substantially all of the assets, of his business. (It’s the feeling I have when the local McDonald’s offers two-for-one

The owners of closely-held businesses are among the greatest benefactors of charitable organizations in this country. Although their contributions to charity are usually effectuated through the transfer of cash or marketable securities, it is often the case that the only asset available to satisfy an owner’s charitable inclinations is his or her interest in the

They’re Still Here

Once upon a time, before the advent of limited liability companies (“LLCs”), taxpayers would occasionally acquire real property in a corporation rather than in a limited partnership.

The corporation may have been created to hold the real property, or it may have been an operating company that, for some misguided reason, decided

During the course of the year, we encounter a number of shareholder disputes. Sometimes we represent a minority shareholder; sometimes we represent the corporation or the majority shareholders. shareholderlit-300x263

Regardless of who the players are, the resolution of the dispute will involve some economic deal. The economic deal, in turn, will depend in no small part