Beyond Income Tax

Over the last several weeks, we have explored various aspects of the choice of entity dilemma that confronts the owners of many closely held businesses, and we have considered how the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act[i] may influence their decision.

In the process, you may have realized that one form of

Hell of a Town

Ask most New Yorkers what New York City has in abundance and you’ll get responses that are as varied as the personalities to whom the question is put. Museums, restaurants, performing arts, college students,[i] office buildings, street food, subway lines, cabs, dog walkers, rats, and politicians are sure to make

One of the thorniest tasks to confront a tax adviser may be having to determine whether the business or investment relationship between two taxpayers constitutes a partnership for tax purposes.

Where the persons involved have formed a limited liability company or a limited partnership under state law, they have formed a tax law partnership[i]

Many of our clients, most of which are closely-held U.S. businesses, are looking to expand their operations overseas. Some are venturing into foreign markets on their own, while others are joint-venturing with established foreign businesses.

In structuring a joint venture, the parties will often form a foreign business entity that affords a significant degree of

“When will they ever learn?”

No, I am not channeling Seeger. I am referring to those individuals[i] who continue to acquire real property (“RP”) in, or who contribute RP to, corporations. In just the last couple of months, I have encountered taxpayers who want to remove RP from the closely held corporations in which

Choice of Entity

One of the first decisions – and certainly among the most important – that the owner of a new business must make is the form of legal entity through which the business will be operated. This seemingly simple choice, which is too often made without adequate reflection, can have far-reaching tax and,