Beyond Income Tax

Over the last several weeks, we have explored various aspects of the choice of entity dilemma that confronts the owners of many closely held businesses, and we have considered how the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act[i] may influence their decision.

In the process, you may have realized that one form of

Dr. Wallace Wrightwood: “You’ve seen hundreds, thousands of pigeons, right?”
George Henderson: “Of course.”
Dr. Wallace Wrightwood: “Have you ever seen a baby pigeon? Well neither have I. I got a hunch they exist.”[i]

When was the last time you pored over a judge’s analysis of the bona fides of a family limited partnership (“FLP”),

An Unreasonable Burden?

One of the reasons often given in support of the elimination of the estate tax is the economic burden it imposes upon the closely-held business; specifically, the requirement that the 40% federal estate tax be satisfied within nine months of the death of the business owner. The imposition of a state “death

Last week’s post explored the federal income tax consequences to a taxpayer who failed to timely file an election for the classification of his wholly-owned business entity.

Today’s post considers how one taxpayer sought to utilize the IRS’s business entity classification rules to reduce his estate’s exposure for NY estate tax. Individuals who are not

“The” Proposed Regulations

They were years in the making – proposed regulations that seek to address what the IRS believes are abuses in the valuation of family-owned business and investment entities. Based upon the volume of commentary generated in response to the proposed rules, it is clear that the IRS has struck the proverbial raw

Appraisal
Is it an art or a science? Is it equal parts of art and science? Is one part weighted more than the other? Do the answers to these questions depend upon the purpose for which the appraisal is being sought? Do they depend upon who is asking the question?

Yes, no, maybe, sometimes.

Not

The owners of a closely-held business confront several issues upon the death of any one of them:

  • How will the decedent’s shares be valued?
  • How will the decedent’s estate pay the resulting estate tax?
  • To whom will the decedent’s shares be transferred?
  • How will the acquiring party pay for such shares?

In most cases, the